What Are Your Social Media Profiles Telling Recruiters?

There is a brand new survey out of human resources technology firm Jobvite, and it focuses on how recruiters are doing their job right now.

If you’re in college and getting ready to graduate, or a student looking for part time work, it’s important to focus on what recruiters are focused on. The survey has a lot of valuable data for young job seekers.

First some good news – the job market is better this year than it was last year. Good candidates are in demand, salaries are up and candidates have more flexibility to negotiate a higher salary.

Beyond your degree and your work and life experience, there is one area that you can focus on now to increase your chances of being hired into a job you want – that is your social media profiles and activity.

social recruitingSocial Recruiting

One important area of increased focus this year for hiring managers is social recruiting. If recruiters are spending more time, money and effort on using social media to find candidates, you can bet they’re spending more time finding and evaluating candidate social media profiles.

What specifically are they focused on? When it comes to your social media images and activity, the following can be red flags:

Typos – We hope there are no typos on your resume, but the survey shows that 72% of recruiters view typos – even on social media – as a negative.

Marijuana – It still illegal in most of the country, and some folks have a moral objection. 71% of recruiters don’t want to see it. If you’re in the job market, leave the party pictures off your profiles.

Oversharing – You might be surprised to see this, but if you’re constantly posting online, a recruiter may wonder whether you’re going to be on your phone all day when at work. If you’re sharing too much personal information, that might call into question your judgment or discretion. If you’re posting too much information about a prior job or employer, especially if it’s negative, that’s definitely a no-no.

Alcohol – Although most people drink at least occasionally, 47% of recruiters take a dim view of it being posted on your public social media. Act accordingly.

Selfies – Posting the odd selfie is no big deal, but be careful not to post too many of them. 18% of recruiters still view selfies as a negative.

Your public social media profiles and activity are becoming an extension of your resume. We’re not all the way there yet, but we’re quickly moving in that direction. Whatever you post on social media, you run the risk that a recruiter will think that’s the real you.

 

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

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Use Social Media To Highlight Soft Skills

An article in the Wall Street Journal today outlines a dilemma employers are facing in today’s changed work environment: it’s tough to find new employees with the appropriate soft skills.

“Companies across the U.S. say it is becoming increasingly difficult to find applicants who can communicate clearly, take initiative, problem-solve and get along with co-workers.

While such skills have always appealed to employers, decades-long shifts in the economy have made them especially crucial now. Companies have automated or outsourced many routine tasks, and the jobs that remain often require workers to take on broader responsibilities that demand critical thinking, empathy or other abilities that computers can’t easily simulate.”

The article cites a Wall Street Journal survey of 900 executives, which found that 92% felt that soft sills are as important as or more important than technical skills.

The article also cites a survey from 2015 performed by LinkedIn, which attempted to identify which soft skills are most in demand, and therefore most likely to land candidates a job. The list of traits, in resumeorder, was:

  • Ability to communicate
  • Organization
  • Capacity for teamwork
  • Punctuality
  • Critical thinking
  • Social savvy
  • Creativity
  • Adaptability

We don’t think that people possessing these traits don’t exist; if companies can’t find them, we put the blame on the recruiting process as it now stands. From what we’ve seen, if 100 candidates apply for a job opening, the standard procedure is that those 100 resumes are uploaded into an Applicant Tracking System (ATS) and an algorithm identifies the 3 or 4 best candidates based on objective criteria programmed into the ATS before the search began. The initial resume-screening phase looks for technical skills and experience – it does not attempt to consider soft skills, and therefore isn’t optimized to find candidates who possess them.

We think the system is going to change, and young employees without a robust job history or deep technical skills could be the biggest beneficiaries. Here’s how.

A CareerBuilder survey earlier this your found that 60% of employers admit to using social media to vet candidates at some point during the recruitment process (we think the real number is higher). If a company is not interviewing/hiring candidates with strong soft skills, it’s probably because the resumes making it through the ATS to the interview stage have strong technical skills, but lack those soft skills.

Looking at candidates’ public social media can be a great way to identify candidates who do possess some of those soft skills, and the opposite. Ability to communicate clearly, attention to detail, social savvy and showing good judgment can all be evaluated for a candidate who is active online, and most candidates are.

This is good news for job seekers with strong soft skills. By sharpening your social media game, you can make yourself more hirable in an era where who you are online is likely to become an increasingly important consideration for hiring managers.

Some experts view social media as primarily a liability for job seekers, and caution candidates to keep the excessive partying, foul language and questionable commentary off of social media. That is a good idea, but we may be entering an era where clean, well thought out social media profiles can be an important asset.

Note to employers: If you’re looking for help making social media vetting a bigger part of your hiring process, ThirdPro can help. To find out how we can help your company, contact us today.

 

 

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Duke Coach Lays Out Social Media Rules For Players

Duke University is known for having high academic standards. According to the football team’s cornerback coach Derek Jones, the football team has high standards as well, and two of the areas they focus on are bringing on players with strong character and keeping distractions to a minimum.

Speaking of character, Jones said that Twitter is the number one source of player character evaluation, and that each time he tells a new recruit critically about something he saw on that player’s Twitter feed, the player is surprised that the coach knew how to look. The coaches know, and players need to be aware.

Duke Derek Jones Twitter

Duke Football Twitter

More comments from coach Jones:

  • Prospects should treat their social media pages like a job resume because [the coaches] do
  • I’ve seen [social media] cost numerous young men opportunities at our place as well as other institutions
  • I’m often asked. ‘How can we judge a kid on one mistake?’ Our jobs depend on the guys we sign. We can’t afford risk
  • We have people to check it all the time. It’s the first thing I do before I follow a young man
  • Alcohol, drug related or guns [are] definite red flags. I’ve dropped kids for all 3. For a prospect, in my opinion, it’s not good to have any gun on there
  • It also sends a bad message when kids are posting after midnight on school nights or during the season. They need to be aware
  • If you have a prospect or aspiring college player, their parents need to be made aware of the seriousness of this issue
  • It’s also important that they don’t repost or retweet inappropriate material. It raises questions about who they really are
  • Prospects must understand they are not like their peers. They are being observed at all times. They can’t do what everyone does

If you’re the parent of a high school athlete, it might sound like a good idea to make sure that his accounts are private, or to delete them altogether. Coach Jones has an answer for that as well: “If it’s private they limit their communication with us.”

With the NCAA recently having expanded how and how much coaches can contact high school players with electronic media, cutting off access is not a good idea.

If your teen has hopes of playing at he college level, and perhaps get a scholarship, social media accounts (especially Twitter) need to be public and professional. It’s that simple.

Derek Jones Twitter

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Infographic: Avoid These Profile Picture Mistakes

Have you resigned yourself to the fact that someone who is going to make a decision about your future will check out your social media profiles? You should. If you’re a teen, you definitely should.

Linkedin LogoSome college admissions officers already are. Those who are handing out scholarships, especially the athletic ones, definitely are. Your future (you hope) employers will too. Ask anybody in a white-collar job if they’d take a meeting with someone without Googling them first.

If you’re active online, you need to focus on not posting anything that makes you look bad to those who are looking to get an impression of who you really are. If you want to get the gold star, you also need to make sure that at least some of what you post online aligns with your education and employment goals.

A good place to start is with your LinkedIn (yes, teens should have a LinkedIn account) and Facebook accounts. Both are indexed by Google making them easy to find, and both require you to use your real name – unless you’re trying to beat the system. Don’t do that.

Where to start? You should start with your profile picture. Here are some things to avoid:

profile photo mistakes

Source: Sales for Life @Sioffy

 

If you are a parent and think that your teen needs some advice on her digital footprint, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

True Story – Why You Should Google Your Kids’ Names

This was a proud week for our family. My oldest graduated from high school and will be heading off to college later this summer. Thankfully his admission to college wasn’t derailed by his online activity or anything else.

I thought I’d share a true story that happened back in early 2013 when we were starting ThirdParent. We were testing some of our processes by running simulations using real people. We were using my son as a subject and one of the first steps is that we Google his name.

Google SERPHe happens to have a fairly common, unisex first name but a very rare last name (for the purposes of this post let’s call him Jessie Stalemate), and I knew for a fact that he was not active on social media, so I didn’t think we’d find much. Much to our surprise, 7 out of the top 10 search results for his exact name were pornography-related. He was 15-years old at the time.

It turns out that an Eastern European porn actress has the exact same name as my son. Yikes. What made the situation even touchier is that the porn results were mostly low quality aggregation sites, and it wasn’t clear at first glance whether they were pictures and video featuring a porn actor named Jessie Stalemate, or collections assembled by a pornography fan named Jessie Stalemate.

By now it’s a given that some college admissions officers and most employers will check you out online at some point in determining what kind of person you are – perhaps before they’ve had the chance to meet you. This was a bad search result in that context. You can imagine some hiring manager doing this search and thinking. “Wow, this kid is really into porn” and moving on to the next candidate.

Googling your teen’s name really is the first step in making sure that his digital footprint is clean, keeping in mind that others will be very quick to form an opinion.

When you do the Google search on your teen, unless he has a unique name, you’ll probably need to add a geographic qualifier. We recommend Googling “Jessie Stalemate”, then “Jessie Stalemate New Jersey”, then “Jessie Stalemate Flemington New Jersey” until you get a result that is mostly your child. If everything is clean, or if you don’t find anything, you’re probably in good shape. That doesn’t tell the whole story though. Google doesn’t index everything, and some social network allow users to hide themselves from search engines. It’s just a starting point on the road to good digital hygiene.

In some situations like this one, there could be a bad actor who has the same name as your child. In other cases, your child may have made a regrettable mistake that made its way online. If either is true, you have some work to do, or you can reach out to us for help. Oh and by the way, we fixed his search results.

 

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Should You Tweet About Your Employer

Lots of stories have been written about employees being fired or disciplined for things they posted on social media. A Pennsylvania case is potentially breaking new ground in social media law circles this month, and it’s sending a message that may not be a good one.

A Chipotle employee was fired last year after a battle with management, where he was attempting to organize workers and agitate for better working conditions. On his list of demands were wages and official work breaks. During his battle with management, he tweeted the following to a happy customer who had gotten a free burrito:

Chipotle worker fired over tweet

Before he was fired, management forced him to delete the tweet, which he did.

The judge in the case ruled that he was incorrectly fired, and ordered Chipotle to pay him back wages and benefits. The judge also ruled that the company acted incorrectly in forcing him to delete the tweet, and that its corporate communications policy unfairly restricted workers’ free speech. The judge stated:

“If you want to tweet something about your personal experience at your job, do it. Tweet at your bosses and your bosses’ bosses. A lot of times your bosses will sugarcoat what’s going on… doing it publicly really puts the spotlight on them.”

So, if you stop short of libel or slander, it is okay to badmouth your employer according to this ruling. Is it a good idea? We don’t think so, unless there is something very dangerous going on.

If you choose to make public, negative comments about your current employer online rather than speaking to someone directly, you aren’t going to make any friends. You might find yourself disciplined or fired for some other offense, or be passed over for promotion.

And, if you do it publicly, you run the risk that any future employer who might consider hiring you will have second thoughts about your loyalty or judgment.

You might be unhappy at the moment, but posting publicly about something as important as your job is adding that comment to your permanent public record. Do you really want that?

 

 

NEW: For a limited time the ThirdParent audit is FREE (normally $49). You can cancel at any time. Sign up today!

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

How To Delete Vine Posts and Re-vines

Vine, the short video sharing app that is owned by Twitter, last year vine-v-logopassed 200 million monthly users. A high percentage of Vine users are also Twitter users, but whether your teen uses Twitter or not, she has probably watched a Vine video (called a “loop” on Vine) from time to time.

If your teen actually posts her own video loops to Vine, it’s a good idea to ask her to take a look through her feed and see if there is content there that a college admissions officer or future employer views that might frown upon. As we all know, what seems funny today might not look like a joke to someone who lacks the context behind the original post, or is looking to make a quick character judgment.

If there are Vine posts that you’d like to get rid of, it’s actually quite easy to do. On your phone, find the video you want to delete. Click the more button “…” at the bottom.

delete-vine.post

Then click “Delete this post”.

vine-post-delete

The above only applies to your original videos that you’ve posted. Note: If someone else re-vined one of your original posts, that loop could be online forever, even after you’ve deleted the original. Think before you post.

A popular activity on Vine is to re-vine others’ videos, so they are shared to your timeline. If you re-vine someone else’s video, and that loop contains profanity, content that is sexist or racist, or just about anything else distasteful, you risk being judged very harshly.

To delete something that you’ve re-vined, locate the video in your timeline. Click on the re-vine button (see below).

delete-re-vine-post

Click “undo”.

delete-revine

As you see, it’s very easy to clean up your Vine feed from your phone. If you prefer to do it on your desktop or laptop, the steps are very similar, but you can do it with fewer clicks.

As Vine grows larger, it’s a good idea to assume that your posts there might be scrutinized, as they might be on Facebook or Twitter. Keeping it clean is always a good idea.

 

 

NEW: For a limited time the ThirdParent audit is FREE (normally $49). You can cancel at any time. Sign up today!

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Smartphones, Social Media and Be Very Careful Out There

Don’t become the subject of the next viral video. Ain’t nobody got time for that.

A fraternity from Indiana University was suspended today for sexual hazing after another very inappropriate incident involving college students made its way online.

According to the Indianapolis Star:

“Indiana University officials said in a statement Thursday morning that there appears to be “credible video evidence” supporting allegations that a fraternity encouraged a pledge to perform a sex act on a woman while other members watched.”

There is credible evidence – we’ve seen the video. We don’t see any proof in the video that the young men are actually members of the fraternity under review, but since they’ve been suspended, we assume that the school has all the info that they need.

If the fraternity members were cavorting with strippers and videotaping it, that is very bad. If senior fraternity members were in fact hazing the juniors – forcing them to commit acts as part of the pledging process – and taping it, that is worse.

What we want to point out here is twofold. First, the posting of the video appears to have been a hit job. Second, the speed at which posts can go viral is mind-boggling. When you combine the two, you have the kind of situation that can get out of hand in a hurry.

Why do we think an enemy of the fraternity posted the video? Well, it first showed up on Twitter as far as we can tell, and then on Reddit (it is on YouTube and other websites now, or was as of this morning).

The anonymous Twitter account that posted the video first (we think) exists solely it seems for the purpose of posting that video, as you can see below.

Indiana-ato

There are no posts before or since other than the retweet of the school’s announcement.

As far as the Reddit post goes, which was posted shorty after the video was posted to Twitter, the post has been locked (no new comments, votes etc.) and the poster’s account appears to have been deleted. The post garnered 2,924 upvotes and 1,641 comments before it was locked.

indiana-frat-video-reddit

If you’re a college student, don’t do anything you’ll regret if it shows up online. When there are smartphones around, which there always are these days, be doubly sure.

Social media has a way of amplifying bad behavior the likes of which we haven’t seen before. Reddit is the 11th most popular website in the country.

Irony alert: the tweet below was posted by the fraternity’s national Twitter account last month.

ATO-Twitter-frat

 

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

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Peeple App Backs Off Original Positioning

Consider this a win for the good guys.

peeple-appIn case you missed it last week (see: Peeple Might Be the Worst Social App Ever), the Peeple app was previewed for a November launch and promised to offer a way for anyone to publicly do an online review of anyone else, as long as some conditions were met. The subject of the reviews would not be able to opt out, and many including us had serious questions about how they would monitor reviews and keep a lid on abuse.

After the initial backlash, it appears that the founders have had second thoughts. Founder Julia Cordray took to LinkedIn yesterday to announce some changes, claiming that the original mission of the app was misunderstood. Perhaps she was smarting from all the abuse that she was taking online. According to her post:

“That’s why Peeple is focused on the positive and ONLY THE POSITIVE as a 100% OPT-IN system. You will NOT be on our platform without your explicit permission. There is no 48-hour waiting period to remove negative comments. There is no way to even make negative comments. Simply stated, if you don’t explicitly say “approve recommendation”, it will not be visible on our platform.”

That is totally different from what was previewed last week, and most likely ensures that the app will not be a hit. Only users who opt in can now be reviewed, and reviews will only become public after the subject approves them.

We’re not saying that you don’t have the right to have a negative opinion of someone – you do. However, a platform that makes it as easy as possible to publicly post negative subjective reviews and cyberbullying is not something the online world needs. Looks like this app will be dead on arrival.

Edit: The website and the company’s social media accounts have gone dark, for now at least.

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Peeple Might Be The Worst Social App Ever

Scheduled to launch around November, Peeple, the Yelp for people, could very well be the app that does the most damage to individuals’ self esteem in the social media landscape. Everyone’s reputation could be at risk.

peeple-appWe’re willing to bet that it doesn’t launch in the form that the founders described yesterday to the Washington Post and covered by The Verge and others, but stranger things have happened.

According to Peeple’s website, their mission is questionable from the get go, and fraught with all kinds of negative possibilities:

“Peeple is an app that allows you to rate and comment about the people you interact with in your daily lives on the following three categories: personal, professional, and dating. Peeple will enhance your online reputation for access to better quality networks, top job opportunities, and promote more informed decision making about people.”

There are some terms and conditions that will/might/probably won’t limit the trolls out there. According to yesterday’s press coverage

  • You need to be 21 and a Facebook user with an account at least six months old to make a review of someone (Facebook doesn’t verify user age so good luck with that safeguard}
  • Reviewers must use their real name (again, we assume the Facebook link serves to verify your name, but it’s easy to establish and entirely fake Facebook persona)
  • People who have been reviewed can report anything inaccurate back to the site
  • To review someone who is not in the Peeple database, you have to add their cell phone number (no idea how this will work in practice, since we’re not sure that Peeple will send a text message verifying that it’s you)

The article at The Verge does a good job wading through the uncertainties in the case of negative reviews:

“…there’s currently no way for users to opt-out of Peeple. Anyone can sign up anyone else if they have their cell number, and although only positive reviews are shown on the profiles of people who haven’t signed up, members of the public can’t see their reviews unless they join. It’s also not clear whether negative reviews are judged to be so based only on the star rating or whether the actual content is also taken into account. If just the former, it means that users could give people extremely negative reviews but a good star rating, with the targets of these write-ups never knowing about them unless they signed up.”

That’s a lot to think about.

According to an preview of Peeple in the Washington Post:

“One does not have to stretch far to imagine the distress and anxiety that such a system would cause even a slightly self-conscious person; it’s not merely the anxiety of being harassed or maligned on the platform — but of being watched and judged, at all times, by an objectifying gaze to which you did not consent.”

That is a very important consideration in our view. Telling someone to their face that they are a nasty person, or did a bad job, or took you on a bad date is one thing; posting it publicly online and linking it to their real name and cell phone number is another entirely.

We don’t wish failure on anyone, but we hope this app doesn’t launch as currently contemplated, and if it does, that it never get off the ground.

Read a very thoughtful take on Peeple from a real life twenty something here.

 

 

 

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.