Instagram Updates Rules on Nudity and Revenge Porn

This week Instagram updated their Community Guidelines with a specific emphasis on what kind of content is and isn’t permissible to post. Of interest is their updated stance on nudity in general, but some of their other rules may surprise you.

instagram-sq-logoRevenge porn is not okay.

“Share only photos and videos that you’ve taken or have the right to share.”

This speaks front and center to the issue of Revenge Porn, or posting pictures of another person without their permission with the intent to embarrass or cause harm. Presumably, if the offended party reports that a picture of them was posted without permission, Instagram will take it down.

Nudity is mostly not okay.

“…for a variety of reasons, we don’t allow nudity on Instagram. This includes photos, videos, and some digitally-created content that show sexual intercourse, genitals, and close-ups of fully-nude buttocks. It also includes some photos of female nipples, but photos of post-mastectomy scarring and women actively breastfeeding are allowed.”

Be careful posting pictures of children, even your own.

“For safety reasons, there are times when we may remove images that show nude or partially-nude children. Even when this content is shared with good intentions, it could be used by others in unanticipated ways.”

This is a good reminder for parents. We often hear stories about kids’ pictures being taken from public social media accounts and used in nefarious ways.

Illegal activity including recreational drug use is not allowed.

“Offering sexual services, buying or selling illegal or prescription drugs (even if it’s legal in your region), as well as promoting recreational drug use are also not allowed.”

The part about drug use is a surprise to us, and is going to be a load of work for Instagram. Currently there are over 13 million posts hashtagged with the term #420, a clear marijuana reference.

We assume that rather than monitoring the whole of Instagram, they will rely on users to report inappropriate photos or posts before reporting. If that is indeed the case, remind your teens to feel free to report anything that they think may inappropriate activity.

 

 

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