Egg Harbor Twp. High School Vs. Social Media

A story in the news this week from our home state of New Jersey is yet another example of the uneasy relationship between high school administrators and their students over the inappropriate use of social media.

Students at Egg Harbor Township High School posted a profanity-laced video on YouTube over the weekend and the video reportedly went viral and was reported to school officials. It’s impossible to say how viral the original post went because it was subsequently taken down, but it was reposted yesterday and has over 16,000 views. Warning: video and comments are NSFW due to the language used.

The high school posted the following comment on Facebook on Monday afternoon, and confirmed that they had reported the video to the police and prosecutor’s office:

ehths youtube video

As is normally the case, school officials declined to state what the exact punishment levied on the video creators was, but local press reports indicate that the students were suspended for 10 days.

A very vocal portion of the student body is not pleased. More than 100, and perhaps as many as 200 students staged a walkout at the high school yesterday, and a petition posted on the Change.org site decrying the harsh punishment has 762 signatures as of this morning. You can find social media posts showing support on various sites under the hashtag #FreeTonyBeatz.

What should have happened? We don’t have all the details, but here’s our take.

It appears that the video was shot on school grounds on the weekend, so likely without permission. The profane video and scenes of fake fighting, guns and gang signs do cast the school in a bad light. The students shouldn’t have posted the video in the first place.

With that being said, 10 days’ suspension is far too harsh, especially for high school seniors looking to get into college. They will miss time from school and this incident could show up on their permanent record.

Finally, we have no idea why the police and prosecutor’s office were called in, unless it was for the act of trespassing.

In summary, we’d love to see the school admins find a way to set things right in cases such as this one without suspending students or involving the police. It seems that it would have been easily doable in this case.

If you have details to add to the story, you can contact us here.

 

 

 

If your teen or tween is active online and you are having trouble keeping up, we can help. We respect your kids’ privacy and give you the tools you need to be a better digital parent. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

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This Week in Social Media News For Parents

Stories for the week ending 11/18/2016

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Facebook has expanded its definition of hate speech to include pretty much any attack on anybody for anything, but excludes things that it deems to be jokes, even if they are in bad taste. They haven’t, however, given any additional details about how they are going to enforce those rules, or how they are going to train staff to support users who are victims.

What does Facebook consider to be hate speech?

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Twitter is also getting more serious about abuse, again. It has expanded its mute function and promises that employees will be retrained to recognize and deal with trolls. Let’s hope for some results.

Twitter announces more tools for dealing with abuse

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Screen Shot 2016-06-17 at 11.27.22 AMYik Yak’s best days appear to be behind it. Could the reason for the decline be that they recently stopped allowing anonymous accounts and posts? Probably not, but they are bringing optional full anonymity anyway.

We messed up. Here’s why we’re making handles optional again and bringing back the Hot feed.

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We assume that teen depression has been a thing for as long as there have been teens. The transition from being a child to being an adult can be a difficult one – a lot of changes are crammed into a seven-year period. Since 2005, cases of teen depression have risen 17%, and researchers are pointing to the rise of social media as the culprit.

More U.S. teenagers are battling major depression in cyber bullying era, study finds

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Thanks to a new law passed in the UK this week, your browsing history is fair game to law enforcement, and any other branch of the government that wants it under some circumstances. ISPs will now be required to store your browsing history for the last 12 months, and make it available to the authorities in any investigation. Seems like bad policy to us.

Britain has passed the ‘most extreme surveillance law ever passed in a democracy’

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When it comes to social media, it’s not just teens behaving badly. An assistant professor at Oberlin College has been fired after her anti Semitic social media posts were reported to school officials – posts that claimed that Jews were responsible for the 9/11 and the Paris terrorist attacks.

Oberlin College Fires Professor Over Anti-Semitic Social-Media Posts

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If your daughter sees a post like this on Snapchat – an account looking to hire young models – she should be very wary:

“We are offering between £450 and £55,000 a shoot depending on who we put you forward for. In terms of different types of modeling we literally do every single type you could think of. Obviously the more you are interested in the better chance you have of getting jobs. This is a one-off opportunity and we are looking for 30 new models. This is purely based on a first come, first served basis. If you are interested, then please give me a message asap. Bear in mind the reason why we have added you to our company Snapchat account is because we are interested in you as well.”

Sinister social media account posing as Irish modelling agency targeting teen girls

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Did we miss an interesting story? Please let us know.

 

 

NEW: For a limited time the ThirdParent audit is FREE (normally $49). You can cancel at any time. Sign up today!

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This Week in Social Media News For Parents

Stories for the week ending 11/4/2016

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If you’ve spent much time thinking about the facial recognition technology being used by Facebook and Google, you might have concluded that it is either fascinating or an incredible invasion of privacy. The latter could be true depending on how they are planning to use it, which is unknown right now. Whether it is an illegal invasion of privacy will be decided by the courts, maybe soon.

Facebook says users can’t stop it from using biometric data

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Prince William wants tech and social media companies to get tougher on cyberbullying. He’s thinking about flying to Silicon Valley to take his message to the bigwigs in person.

Prince William is expected to hold talks with Facebook and Apple about online trolling

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Screen Shot 2016-06-17 at 11.27.22 AMA UK insurance company wants to access your Facebook account to determine whether you’re likely to be a safe driver, and therefore eligible to receive discounts. Not so fast, says Facebook. That sort of screening is against their developer rules.

Facebook blocks UK insurer Admiral from profiling users for discounts

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Prediction: Instagram shopping is going to be a big hit.

Instagram Wants to Ease Its Users into Shopping

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Good news, of sorts. Ryan Collins, one of the hackers behind the brutally widespread celebrity hacking incident of 2014 has been sentenced to 18 months in jail. The married father of two worked tirelessly over a two-year period to hack into more than 100 celebrity Gmail and Apple iCloud accounts. Now he’s going to pay.

Celeb nude photo thief Ryan Collins sentenced to 18 months in jail

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A young woman from Maryland has gone viral on Facebook after she aggressively called out a stranger threatening to post nude videos of her that he obtained illegally. Maryland police and the FBI are investigating.

Her response to ‘cyber bully’ who threatened to release naked video? Go public

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Prediction 2: This will end quickly. Facebook allows advertisers to profile which users they target with ads based on “ethnic affinity.” And Facebook decides which race you’re aligned with.

Facebook draws criticism for ‘ethnic affinity’ ad targeting

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Did we miss an interesting story? Please let us know.

 

 

For a limited time the ThirdParent audit is FREE (normally $49). You can cancel at any time. Sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

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Do Bosses Check Social Media When Employees Are Out Sick?

Most employees, whether they are teenage part time workers or adult full timers, don’t appear to give much thought to calling in sick as long as they don’t do it too often. From what we’ve seen, these sick days can sometimes be “mental health days”, when the employee isn’t sick but just needs a break.

snooWe aren’t judging people here, but we saw a thread on Reddit recently where some people commented on their strategies around whether they connect with coworkers on social media, and what has happened when things went wrong.

On connecting with people from work, the two most popular posts were:

“If you are dumb enough to give yourself away on social media you deserve it.”

and

“This has been happening for years. That’s why I don’t friend/follow people from work. That’s also why I rarely use social media, I don’t want everyone to anyways know what I’m up to.”

Apparently a lot of people feel strongly that it’s a bad idea to be social media friends with people from work, particularly your boss. What’s the downside? Well, your coworkers might stop trusting you for one thing.

“My coworker asked me to cover for her the other day because “her father in law just got diagnosed with stage iv colon cancer and she needs to be there to support him”. Then she posted pictures to Facebook of her tailgating all day and going to a football game. She asked me to cover for her again this weekend and I was like f*** no.”

and

“I had a coworker ask me to cover her opening shift one time. I happened to be on FB and saw pictures she posted from the previous night, drinking and having a good time. She wasn’t ill, she was hung over. She made her decision and did that to herself. I said no.”

You can also get into hot water for badmouthing fellow employees or the company:

“We did have an issue with a co-worker going on Twitter and posting her issues with various co-workers during business hours with it displaying prominently on her page where she worked. She got fired.”

You should avoid doing that whether you are linked to your coworkers or not.

And the people who make the mistake of posting their antics after calling in sick:

“Dude at my job said he was sick and used a sick day to go to his own wedding. Posted pics on FB. Fired next day.”

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“A former coworker of mine got fired this way. She was supposed to be on short term disability for being in a car accident, but her Facebook pictures had her in Hawaii and other places vacationing. When my employer decided to downsize, she was one of the first to be let go.”

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“Went to the movies to see Batman vs. Superman with my fiancée after calling in sick. I have no coworkers added but my fiancée is friends with some of mine. Well… like most women do, they have to take pictures of dates & that’s how I got my first write up.”

This mindset was prevalent throughout:

People getting in trouble for this crap are completely stupid. If you lied about being sick and instead went to Disneyland, maybe don’t post the photos from Disneyland until a couple weeks later.”

In summary, it’s up to you whether your connect with coworkers on social media, but if you do, the risks are elevated if:

  • You make negative comments about your coworkers, company or customers
  • You call in sick and post proof that you aren’t

Always post wisely, as if you assume others will see what you’re putting online. The others in this case might be your bosses. When you post publicly online, you’ve given up your right to privacy.

 

 

If your teen or tween is active online and you are having trouble keeping up, we can help. We respect your kids’ privacy and give you the tools you need to be a better digital parent. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Researchers are Tackling Online Anonymity

Anonymous-ish app Yik Yak isn’t dead yet, but there are indications that it may be headed in that direction. We think they’ll survive in some form, but the changes they have made since they launched in 2013 speak to to the struggle they have had to outlive their initial burst of popularity.

Rutgers Yik YakWhen Yik Yak started out, all posts were anonymous. The location of the user who posted was and is central to how Yik Yak works – each Yik Yak “community” is defined as all user within a certain radius, regardless of whether they know each other. Since the initial iteration of Yik Yak was totally anonymous, any user’s identity was impossible to pinpoint unless it was offered.

A lot has changed since 2013. Actually, a lot has changed in 2016.

In March, Yik Yak introduced optional “handles” or user names. With that update, users were required to select a user name. The name could be their real name or something else, but they were not required to use that name when posting. From what we saw, few people both chose their real name and used it when posting, so Yik Yak continued to be mostly anonymous.

In April, the company introduced messaging. The world didn’t need another messaging app, but apparently the theory was that now that you have an identity, someone who likes your posts might want to privately reach out to you. We have no idea how much traction they got with messaging.

In August, the company took its latest step in ditching full anonymity, requiring users to post with their handle. Yik Yak is anonymous no more, although people still might not know who is behind your screen name.

Now researchers are digging in to just how anonymous users are, even when they don’t use their real name. Professors at NYU Tandon School of Engineering and NYU Shanghai are presenting research this week focused on Yik Yak’s GPS system. By using Yik Yak and tricking their own devices into thinking they were at various locations on a campus, they were able to use machine learning to pinpoint with great accuracy which building Yik Yak posts were coming from.

By their logic, if their machine learning techniques were able to pinpoint the location of posts, identification of actual users will not be far behind.

We understand that there are some benefits to posting anonymously, including enhanced freedom of expression. We caution social media users, however, that it is inevitable that technology will catch up at some point, and the perceived “safety” of anonymity will disappear.

Whether social media users, especially young ones, are posting online suing their real name or anonymously, there is always the possibility that your identity will be found out.

 

 

If your teen or tween is active online and you are having trouble keeping up, we can help. We respect your kids’ privacy and give you the tools you need to be a better digital parent. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

This Week in Social Media News For Parents

Stories for the week ending 10/28/2016

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$33 million idea – create a video sharing platform and app where videos are limited to 6 seconds. That sounds silly, but Vine worked just fine for years. Twitter bought them for around $33 million in 2012. Now they’re shutting it down. Thanks Snapchat.

A eulogy for Vine, the best place on the internet

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The American Academy of Pediatrics really, really wants kids to have less screen time. That’s not happening from what we can see. Our digital babysitters are here to stay, until something better comes along.

Kids need less screen time, says American Academy of Pediatrics

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Screen Shot 2016-06-17 at 11.27.22 AMTwo teenage girls from Syracuse, NY have been arrested after posting a Facebook video of them attacking a defenseless old man was posted to Facebook. It looks like they were doing it for kicks. We fail to see the humor.

Two teen girls arrested after 62-year-old man attacked in Facebook video

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A Twitter account dedicated to showing fights at New Jersey’s Neptune High School has been shut down.

Neptune High School ‘wilding’ fights shut down online

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A 19-year old Texas A&M student has her picture prominently featured on newspapers across the Lone Star State this week and she probably isn’t happy about it. Driving, sexting and Snapchat don’t mix, especially when that combination has you rear ending a cop car.

POLICE: TEXAS STUDENT TRIES TO SEND TOPLESS PHOTO VIA SNAPCHAT, SLAMS INTO COP CAR

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An Australian teen is suing a number of online publications including the Daily Mail for publishing images and photoshops of his epic mullet. Before the real media got involved, it appeals that the youth was going viral on social media because of the bad hairdo. A judge is allowing the case to continue, for now.

A teenager is suing websites for making fun of his mullet with memes

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Did we miss an interesting story? Please let us know.

 

 

NEW: For a limited time the ThirdParent audit is FREE (normally $49). You can cancel at any time. Sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

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Survey: What Does Adult Cyberbullying Look Like?

We wrote earlier this week about how younger people and those who spend more time on social media are more likely to be harassed online. That doesn’t mean that you should spend less time online – just that you need to be prepared for if and when the bad guys come knocking.

teen-cyberbullyingIt’s pretty straightforward stuff for adults, but doesn’t necessarily come as second nature to kids. That’s where parents come in.

The survey that we referenced was a little off the beaten path for us since the survey respondents were adults only – 18 years old and up. Normally we focus on child and teen issues. We thought we’d take a second look at the survey to highlight what types of adult harassment and cyberbullying are happening with adults these days, and what it means for families trying to safely and happily get around online.

Survey respondents reported having been subjected to the following:

  • Called offensive names – 17%
  • Received comments designed to embarrass – 14%
  • Received harmful comments about their appearance – 9%
  • Had personal details posted online – 7%
  • Victim of an online stalker – 6%
  • Repeatedly harassed over time – 6%
  • Threats of physical harassment – 4%
  • Sexual harassment – 4%

When asked about the above offenses, female social media users were much more likely than men to experience unwanted comments about their appearance, stalking and sexual harassment.

Does what happens online stay online? Not necessarily, even for adults. Of social media users who had been harassed, 28% of females say that it had an impact on their real world lives versus 19% of men.

It is probably obvious to parents that female kids are more likely to be harassed sexually or stalked online. As our young, inexperienced daughters venture online for the first time, it might not be as obvious to them.

Before you hand your child their first connected device you should be warning them about what may happen online, regardless of whether they’re a boy or a girl. With our daughters, it makes sense to be very clear about what the bad guys might be up to, and don’t think that tweens are too young to need this kind of guidance. The trolls get started early.

 

 

 

If your teen or tween is active online and you are having trouble keeping up, we can help. We respect your kids’ privacy and give you the tools you need to be a better digital parent. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Canadian Survey Weighs Cyberbullying on Social Media

Unsurprising conclusion: The more time you spend on social media, the more likely you are to be harassed by another user.

That is just one takeaway from a new survey of social media users by the Angus Reid Institute in Canada. Canadians generally have the reputation of being kindler and gentler than those of us on this side of the border, but the results of the survey show that cyberbullying trends are similar in both countries.

The survey polled 1,530 adults aged 18 and up. Of the group, 89% were users of social media in varying degrees, and that number is 98% for the 18 – 34 year old respondents. Percentage of respondents who use the following social networks at least a couple of times per week:
sm-harassment

  • Facebook – 69%
  • Twitter – 17%
  • Instagram – 15%
  • Snapchat – 10%
  • LinkedIn – 8%
  • Tumblr – 5%
  • Other – 11%

When the survey looks at the frequency of social media use, they grouped respondents into the following categories:

  • 18% are Super Users who use multiple networks, multiple times per day
  • 42% are Frequent Users who use social media every day
  • 16% are Regular Users who use social media at least once per week
  • 11% are Light Users who are mostly on Facebook, but don’t use it very often
  • 15% don’t currently use social media, but some of those did but have quit

When looking at the responses of all who do use social networks, 31% claim that they have been cyberbullied on social media. Of the Super Users, fully 50% have experienced harassment online.

It’s pretty clear from the results that the more time you spend online, the more likely you are to experience harassment.

When considering the age of the respondents, as you might expect younger users tend to be a rougher crowd. 44% of the 18 – 34 year old cohort report having been harassed online at some point.

What does this mean for parents? Well, teens younger than 18 were not included in the survey, but two factors – age and time spent online – seem to correlate highly with the incidence on online abuse. If your teens are like mine, they are young by definition and tend to spend A LOT of time online.

As a parent, if your teen or tween hasn’t been harassed online yet, you should be prepared for the chance that she might be. There is no better preparation for this than talking about it today.

Establish an action plan for how she will respond when it happens, and that she should come to you for help is she is unsure of what to do. You can also review what options are available for dealing with abusers on each social network.

Incidentally, when asked how well social media companies are dealing with abusive users, 53% say that the networks are not doing enough to prevent the bad actors from cyberbullying, or doing something about it when it is reported.

Check back later this week for Part 2, where we look at what types of cyberbullying the survey found to be common online.

 

 

 

If your teen or tween is active online and you are having trouble keeping up, we can help. We respect your kids’ privacy and give you the tools you need to be a better digital parent. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

This Week in Social Media News For Parents

Stories for the week ending 10/21/2016

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Facebook reads your messages – even the private messages sent via FB Messenger – in order to decide which ads to serve you. Who knows what else they’re doing with your info. Despite that, Amnesty International gives Facebook Messenger the highest grades for messaging privacy.

Which messaging apps best protect your privacy?

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Google also uses almost everything it knows about you to target ads to you. They are happy to share with advertisers that you drive a Toyota, like Diet Coke and the NY Giants and went to Jamaica last winter. So far they have stopped short of attaching your name (or other info that they glean from your Gmail account) to your advertising profile, but it looks like they are going to start. In the words of one tech critic:

“Why is Google doing this? To make even more money? Or because they need to do this to keep making the same amount of money? Either way it’s gross.”

Google Has Quietly Dropped Ban on Personally Identifiable Web Tracking

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Screen Shot 2016-06-17 at 11.27.22 AMIt appears that Twitter thinks that their lack of user growth is their biggest problem They have been looking to sell the company, and reports are circulating this week that interested buyers have passed because they’re turned off by Twitter’s problem with harassment and abuse. Maybe Twitter’s inability to silence the trolls is the bigger problem.

Disney Dropped Twitter Pursuit Partly Over Image

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Doctors told a Michigan man that it might take 5 years for him to get the kidney transplant he sorely needed. His daughter started a Facebook page for the cause and found a donor in weeks.

Daughter Finds Kidney for Her Dad Through Facebook Page

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100 million users, most of them teen and tween girls, are already using the Musical.ly app. My daughter is one of them. That’s a good start, but the app now faces the very tall task of transforming from a one trick pony (lip sync GIFs) to a full-fledged social network. GLWT

The Chinese Music App That Wants to Be the Next Facebook

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If at any point in the future your plans might include being a fugitive from the police, you might want to curtail your selfie activity. The Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown U. thinks that the FBI already has a database of over 117 million Americans’ faces, and that number is only going higher from here.

Facial recognition technology is taking over US, says privacy group

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4chan, widely regarded as one of the worst places on the internet, is rumored to be for sale. That’s a tough one. Does anyone want to be responsible for that cesspool? Maybe not, because now they’re asking for donations.

Donate to 4chan

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Some UK students were suspended after taking upskirt photos of their teacher and circulating them on Snapchat. The teacher, 23 years old, is understandably worried about keeping control of her classroom.

“My a$$ is all over Snapchat” Pupils take upskirt photos as teacher leans over

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This month’s Pokémon GO update is aimed squarely at users who are inclined to play while driving. Don’t do that.

‘POKÉMON GO’ JUST BECAME EVEN HARDER TO PLAY WHILE DRIVING

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Did we miss an interesting story? Please let us know.

 

 

NEW: For a limited time the ThirdParent audit is FREE (normally $49). You can cancel at any time. Sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Instagram Resources for Bullying and Self-Injury Victims

Instagram logoInstagram is a community of sorts, so it makes sense that you would be able to report people in the community who are harming you, or who appear to be at risk of harming themselves.

We’ll be the first to admit that Instagram has done a good job creating such resources for users, and they are getting better. This week they announced that they are extending their helpline resources to a number of additional countries in Asia including Japan, Korea and Singapore.

The way the self-harm resources work is that an algorithm is running in the background that attempts to identify and reach out to users who appear to be at risk, and then offer to connect that user to a third party organization that can offer support.

ig-cutting-1

Let’s take a look at an example. This morning, we opened the search window and typed “cutting”, a hashtag frequently (too frequently) used by people who are engaged in self-harm. Workout fanatics also use that hashtag, which is probably why Instagram hasn’t killed it off entirely. When we proceeded to the search results, the message at right is displayed. If you click “Get Support” you are prompted with the options of messaging a friend, contacting a helpline or clicking thorough to a list of tips and support resources.

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ig-cutting-2

If we instead opt to see the search results, we might be unlucky enough to see the image at right. This user claims to be in recovery, but does not appear to be doing very well. If you are so inclined, you can report that user to Instagram and hope that they’ll facilitate some sort of help.

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ig333

To that end, if you want to report anybody else’s account to Instagram, either because the account or a post is in any way inappropriate (self-harm, illegal activity, pornography…) or because you are being cyberbullied, click the three dots (…) at top right and the menu at right appears. The top two choices on the following screen allow you to report a user who appears to be a risk of self-injury, or to report an incident or harassment or bullying.

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ig444
Finally, there is help for users who are the victim of abusive comments posted under their posts. You can report those as well, but it’s a little trickier. If you see an abusive comment, tap the comment bubble below the pic and swipe left on the offending comment. You can then delete the comment (a great option) or tap the “!” (pictured at right) and report the comment.

Note: In our experience Instagram is not all that responsive to user inquiries so we aren’t sure how well these options work. In their defense, we have not heard reports of users complaining to Instagram about abuse and not getting resolution, as is often the case with Twitter.

 

 

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.