Teens Haven’t Abandoned Facebook

Facebook logoFacebook is dead to us.”

Why teens are leaving Facebook: It’s “meaningless”.”

3 reasons young people think Facebook is lame.”

U.S. teens are deserting Facebook faster than ever.”

There have been no shortage of headlines and thought pieces over the last four years about Facebook being on death’s door with teens, and as the logic goes, on its way to obsolescence. Teen preference is viewed as an early indicator of what will be mainstream consumer behavior down the road, so if teens aren’t using Facebook now, surely they won’t be using it as adults.

In a piece that we wrote yesterday citing teen research by brokerage firm Piper Jaffray, we noted that teens do indeed prefer both Instagram and Snapchat to Facebook. That is true for the moment, and maybe will be true in the future, but there is data in the survey that paints an anything but grim picture for the future of Facebook.

The survey polled 10,000 teens – a very big sample – and the full survey results broke out responses by age. Percentage of teens who use Facebook:

  • 14-year olds – 34%
  • 15-year olds – 43%
  • 16-year olds – 54%
  • 17-year olds – 62%
  • 18-year olds – 62%

That trend is pretty clear: Older teens are more likely to use Facebook than younger teens. It probably wasn’t always true. Before Snapchat and Instagram existed, of course Facebook was probably number one with 14-year olds. It was the only show in town.

Today, Snapchat and Instagram are cooler, but older teens are indeed adopting Facebook. We touched on why that might be true back in April 2015. Here’s what we currently see happening that is driving later teen Facebook adoption, but adoption nonetheless:

“Sign in using Facebook” – this is the go to onboarding method for many apps, internet sites and messaging forums, many of which make logging in with Facebook the easiest or only login method. 54% of social sign ins are made using a Facebook account.

Dating – Facebook remains the easiest way to check out that cute girl you saw at a school dance or football game. If you like what you see online, or confirm that she doesn’t appear to have a boyfriend, sending a friend request is much less anxiety producing than asking them out on a date.

Facebook Messenger – Especially early on in a friendship, it is easier to add someone on Facebook then hit them up via Messenger than to ask for their phone number. Messenger is the preferred massaging app for lots of people.

Family – If a mom asks a teen, “Did you see the pictures of cousin Heather’s new baby?” she is probably referring to pictures posted on Facebook.

In early 2015, a Pew Research survey found that 71% of teens use Facebook. According to the data in the Piper Jaffray study, that number is now down to 52% 18 months later. That’s a big decline, but higher numbers for older teens indicate to us that Facebook, while slightly less dominant due to the number of cool alternatives, isn’t going away any time soon.

From Venture Capitalist Josh Elman:

screen-shot-2016-10-18-at-9-45-27-am

Even if Facebook isn’t as cool as it was, it’s becoming something of a utility.

 

 

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Ranking Teen Social Media Preference

Brokerage firm Piper Jaffray does a semiannual survey of teen preferences – from shopping to TV watching. We’ve written about it before, and the section on social media usage is always something that we focus on. As a reminder, here are the rankings of the surveyed teens’ “most important” social network from 12 months ago.

Piper teen survey social media

As you can see, Instagram was the clear #1 last year, Twitter preference was moving down, Facebook was stable in the teens and Snapchat was beginning to make inroads.

Fast-forwarding twelve months, the new results are in. This time around the survey polled 10,000 teens about a number of topics, and when it comes to social media the momentum of Snapchat is undeniable. Below is the percentage of teens’ who ranked each network their top social site or app for fall 2016:

snapchat-logo

  • Snapchat – 35%
  • Instagram – 24%
  • Twitter – 13%
  • Facebook – 13%
  • Pinterest – 1%
  • Google+ – 1%

The survey also asked the teens which network they use at least once a month.

  • Snapchat – 80%
  • Instagram – 79%
  • Twitter – 56%
  • Facebook – 52%
  • Pinterest – 25%
  • Google+ – 22%

It’s pretty clear that Snapchat and Instagram are dominating teen time and attention right now. Pictures and video are hot, both in the context of messaging and making permanent posts.

There are more interesting tidbits in the survey. When asked where/how teens consume video/TV, a big time evolution is happening. This shift may be clear to you if you’ve got a teen living in your house. As of this survey, YouTube passed conventional TV for the first time in terms of preferred viewing medium, and Netflix continues to be the leader.

  • Netflix – 37%
  • YouTube – 26%
  • Cable TV – 25%
  • Hulu – 3%
  • Other streaming – 6%

In terms of mobile devices, iPhone continues to dominate and looks to get stronger. 74% of the teens surveyed own an iPhone, up from 69% in April of this year, and 79% said that their next phone will probably be an iPhone. We’re not sure whether the bulk of the responses came in before or after high end Samsung phones started catching fire, but we suspect that it was before.

When it comes to teen social media preference, a couple of things are clear:

  • Pictures and video are where it’s at currently
  • Permanent vs. ephemeral is an important distinction and perhaps more important than public vs. private

With Instagram for example, your account can be public or private, but even if it is private it is public to your friends who can all see it – and make no mistake, what your friends think of your pictures is very important. Instagram is the home for your permanent images, and you may also use it for messaging. If you don’t want that image living on into next week or next year, you’ll probably use Snapchat.

 

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

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This Week in Social Media News For Parents

Stories for the week ending 10/14/2016

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The UK’s Crown Prosecution Service has introduced new guidelines around how they are planning to prosecute cyberbullies and trolls. Sounds like they’re going to get tough.

UK’s chief troll hunter targets doxxing, virtual mobbing, and nasty images

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A Colorado group of teen Antisemites formed a private Facebook group to share their thoughts, which is bad from the get go. Police this week revealed that the “leader” of the group committed suicide to show solidarity. Five of the students were expelled.

Teenage ‘Fuhrer’ of neo-Nazi Facebook page where high school students talked about ‘hanging Jews on trees’ commits suicide ‘to show allegiance to the group’
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Screen Shot 2016-06-17 at 11.27.22 AMRelated – Fusion takes a look at what may be behind the surge of racist social media posts by students.

Squad of high school students under investigation for racist, viral Instagram photo

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Snapchat continues to shake things up, making it difficult for old people to figure out how to use it and keeping competitors from catching up. Now they’re giving users more control to watch their friends’ stories first.

Snapchat launches post-roll ads, Story Playlist that loads favorites in bulk

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Messaging app Kik has been a fruitful hunting ground for predators and cyberbullies. As 60% of Kik’s 300 million users are teens, the app needs to take serious steps to protect its users. This week they announced that they are rolling out a host of measures to keep users safe – physically and mentally. One new feature is an AI-powered bot that will keep watch for users who might be hurting.

Kik steps up efforts to keep teen users safe

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Did you watch the second Presidential debate? 63 million people watched it on live TV. You might be surprised to hear that almost twice as many, 124 million, watched at least part of the debate on YouTube.

YouTube challenged TV in the second presidential debate

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An Aussie man caught his stepdaughter sexting and wanted to put a stop to it. He confiscated the girl’s phone, saved the offending images on a USB stick and went to the police. When the police searched his home later, they found the USB stick with the images and charged him with possession of child porn. He has been placed on the sex offender registry. Really.

Victorian man convicted after reporting stepdaughter’s sexting

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Did we miss an interesting story? Please let us know.

 

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Why Teens Are Drawn to Social Media Challenges and Dares

Today’s children are digital natives, with nine in ten teens admitting openly that they regularly use social media to stay in touch with their friends and peers. With all of this clicking and liking comes a hidden danger often overlooked by parents, educators, and adults. This surprising pitfall is the prevalence of online social media challenges and the potential health and mental pitfalls they harbor.

Take for instance the wildly popular cinnamon challenge that encouraged viewers to attempt to swallow a spoonful of the dry spice without any liquid. Even though it appears harmless, within just a few months of 2012 nationwide poison centers had received 178 calls concerning cinnamon overdoses and over the years children have suffered asphyxiation or serious burns to the lungs that require medical attention.

Unfortunately, the cinnamon challenge is not unique. Whether it’s the Kylie Jenner lip challenge or the choking game, unknowingly, many of our kids are attempting to recreate challenges or dares they find online. These desires often outweigh good sense, compelling teens to try their hand at some very obvious dangers and risky behaviors.

Just a Sample: 3 Popular Challenges on Social Media

Listed below are a few current challenges making the rounds on social media:

dare-social.mediaThe Duct Tape Challenge. There’s not much that duct tape won’t fix, but boredom shouldn’t be one of them. In this challenge, children duct tape a willing participant to a pole and watch them break free. Unfortunately, there are documented cases of falls resulting in serious head injuries.

Butt Chugging or Eyeballing. Instead of traditional underage drinking antics, children funnel alcohol into their rectums or eyes to get drunk fast. For an added twist, some girls have begun inserting alcohol soaked tampons to achieve similar effects. These behaviors can lead to alcohol poisoning, damage of body tissue, blindness (eyeballing), and even death.

Smoking Alcohol. This challenge involves vaporizing and inhaling gases from alcohol to reduce calories. However, unfiltered vapors bee-line straight to the brain and lungs which elevates the chances for alcohol poisoning.

Risks Associated with Social Media Challenges

Besides the physical dangers, early high-risk behaviors can be powerful factors in brain development. A child’s environment and activities are hardwiring the brain, influencing which genes will be activated within a person’s genome. Research has demonstrated how adolescent brains undergo a dramatic growth surge that relies on genetics, environment, and experiences. Participating in social media challenges fulfills part of this equation.

The neural patterns and released hormones have the potential to cause patterns that trigger addiction, repeated high-risk behaviors, and more. Today’s children are making uninformed choices based on challenges that could physically or mentally affect them for years merely for a few “likes” or cool status update.

Understanding The Appeal of Social Media Challenges

It is no secret that the awkward stage of adolescence is greatly impacted by hormones- mainly estrogen and testosterone. Research has recently proven that there are receptors for these hormones in different parts of the body, including the organs and brain. These receptors allow other hormones and neurotransmitters like oxytocin, vasopressin, dopamine, and serotonin to influence brain development.

Dopamine, widely known for feelings of joy and pleasure, plays a powerful part in the development of the prefrontal cortex which leads adolescents to embrace greater risks to achieve happiness. In the beginning of maturation, dopamine circulates in the prefrontal cortex, but deep inside the reward center of the brain, dopamine levels are constantly evolving. These changing levels lead to needing increased levels of stimulation or excitement to reach similar levels of pleasure as their adult counterparts do. As a nasty side effect to this process, addictions easily form in teenagers.

teen-sextingAnother factor influencing the popularity of social media challenges, is how teens often overestimate risk. Teens often get lost in the details about specific risks, focusing heavily on the rewards involved. The reward at the end of the challenge is what matters. Whether it is the satisfaction of completing a goal, garnering more likes, or comparing oneself to their peers, the reward is only magnified when social media is the primary mode of communication.

Looking Ahead

Social media challenges prey and thrive on the driving forces of peer pressure, underdeveloped prefrontal cortexes, and the compulsion to fit in with their peers. It’s easy to say that only high-risk youth or thrill seeking youngsters are the only kids attempting these challenges. However, this study attributes these behaviors to a child’s limited self-regulation and development. It explains that these challenges have potential appeal to all children, boys and girls from every demographic. Granted, this thought can be frightening, leading many of us to imagine the worst-case scenario featuring our children experimenting with online challenges. Thankfully, awareness and education are powerful first deterrents when it comes to halting the lure online media challenges have toward our children.

 

This guest post was contributed by Amy Williams.

Amy Williams is a free-lance journalist based in Southern California and mother of two. As a parent, she enjoys spreading the word on positive parenting techniques in the digital age and raising awareness on issues like cyberbullying and online safety.

You can find Amy on Twitter @AmyKWilliams1

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

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NLRB Favors Northwestern U. Athletes’ Social Media Rights

Are football players on Northwestern University’s football team employees of Northwestern University? As of this month, the answer is definitely “maybe”, and has interesting implications when it comes to the players’ social media use.

northwestern_u-logoIn 2015, the Northwestern football players were attempting to unionize, and took their case to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). The NRLB ruled that they could not unionize, because such a ruling would create a serious curve ball for public, state-owned universities that play by a different set of rules. On the issue of whether the players are employees, the NLRB declined to rule.

Last year, in a separate case, the NRLB was asked to look at the football team’s rules, which the players thought were unfair when it comes to freedom of speech. The NLRB issued an “advice memo” last month, concluding that the athletes should be treated as employees, and as such the rules – particularly the rules surrounding social media and dealing with the press – were indeed unfair. They stopped short of saying that the athletes are employees.

Despite the fact that the ruling was an “advice memo”, Northwestern agreed to change the rules in a couple of ways. The changes are memorialized in an updated version of the player handbook:

Previous: social media posts by football players may be “regularly monitored” by athletic department, university officials and campus police

Updated: public social media “can be seen by any person with a smart phone or internet access, including individuals within Northwestern University

Previous: players could not agree to an interview unless the athletic communications office has arranged the interview

Updated: players may either speak directly to the media or refer that person to the athletic communications office

While we understand that free speech is important, we don’t think that the players have gained much here unless the previous rules allowed school admins to monitor private social media communications. We haven’t heard of such a policy being in place at Northwestern or any other university.

The most important phrase here is “public social media can be seen by any person…” Public is public, and while many have tried to make a more nuanced distinction, there isn’t one to be made.

Our message to the Northwestern players is to continue to be careful what you post on social media and divulge to the media. Your team and school still have rules that you need to abide by. For example, under the revised Northwestern rules, players are still prohibited from posting “full or partial nudity (of yourself or another), sex, racial or sexual epithets, underage drinking, drugs, weapons or firearms, hazing, harassment or unlawful activity.” Just because you’re free to say something doesn’t mean that saying it is a good idea, either online or in the press. Just because something is true doesn’t mean you should share it with the public or journalists.

 

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today.

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

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AT&T Teams With Schools to Fight Cyberbullying

Too much of the burden around youth cyberbullying gets put on schools – education, prevention, investigating cases and punishing perpetrators. It’s nice to see any time corporate America gets involved to lend a hand.

att-logoThe Teen Indie Awards for students films were held last night in New York, and showcased the winners in AT&T’s new effort to help schools combat cyberbullying.

The Cyberbullying Film Invitational was promoted and managed by AT&T and Fullscreen and attracted more than 250 student filmmakers from across the country. AT&T handed out awards to the best films, and plans to use footage from the winning films to produce an educational cyberbullying resource for schools. The video will be available, for free, to schools starting in March of next year.

The big winners from the contest:

  • Steilacoom High School, Steilacoom, WA, cash prize of $5,000
  • Mythic Bridge, Brooklyn, NY, cash prize of $3,500
  • Canyon Crest Academy, San Diego, CA, cash prize of $2,500

Other finalists winning $2,500 awards:

  • Grace Church School, New York, NY
  • Communications High School, Wall, NJ
  • Nature Coast Technical High School, Brooksville, FL

Other finalists winning $1,000 awards:

  • Cedar Crest High School, Lebanon, PA
  • Rye Country Day School, Rye, NY
  • Digital Arts and Cinema Technology High School, Brooklyn, NY
  • Pine Crest School, Fort Lauderdale, FL
  • Science and Leadership Academy, Philadelphia, PA

An additional Public Choice award of $5,000 will be given out at a future date. You can vote for your favorite school here (Edit: voting now closed.

According to Marissa Shorenstein, New York State President, AT&T,

“An astounding 8-in-10 teenagers admit to being cyberbullied, or know someone who has been bullied through social media or text. We know this issue is very real for students, schools and families and AT&T wants to help. AT&T congratulates the student participants of our first Cyberbullying Film Invitational. We look forward to incorporating their powerful short films into our national film.”

Thank you and congratulations to all students who were involved, and thanks to AT&T for an outstanding effort to help the youth community. Thanks also for giving these budding filmmakers a stage to show their work.

 

 

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

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FCC To Vote On New Broadband Privacy Rules

There may be good news coming this month for privacy conscious broadband internet customers. Actually, it’s not as good as a previously proposed version of the proposal, but it’s still good news that the Federal Communications Commission is getting more serious about privacy. And it’s about time.

computer privacyCurrently, broadband companies can use your personal information without getting your permission ahead of time. There’s probably something that you signed when you originally chose your provider that states what they might do with your data, but customers largely ignore that type of thing until something bad happens. The FCC wants to change that.

The version of the plan penned in March would have require broadband companies like Verizon and Comcast to get customer consent before sharing any information about users with their advertising partners. That seems like a good idea to us but would have put cable and phone companies at a disadvantage versus internet companies like Google, who are governed by the Federal trade Commission.

The updated version, which will be voted on by the FCC on October 27, allows broadband providers to share some of your personal information with advertisers, such as your name and address, which the FCC now deems to be “non-sensitive”. What has changed is that if the measure passes, broadband companies will have to get approval to use more sensitive information such as your phone’s physical location, websites browsed and apps used, and what’s in your emails.

Also, since advertisers aren’t the only problem, the FCC also wants to require the companies to inform you within 30 days if your data has been hacked.

That last thing seems pretty obvious, and the 30-day window should be shorter.

This whole thing is a move in the right direction, but stops short of being a “good” rule. I don’t think that my name and home address are “non sensitive” information, and neither should you. It’s an outrage that until now, your internet provider could scan and use the contents of your emails.

On the bright side, if this measure does create more protections for consumers, and perhaps shines a bright light on privacy issues that exist in the current internet landscape, it feels like progress. We need to keep working on it.

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

This Week in Social Media News For Parents

Stories for the week ending 10/7/2016

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It’s 2016, the easiest time in history to make something go viral. Even clowns. They’re all over social media and have been spotted (or at least reported) in 28 states. We’ve been among the many people asking, “Why now? Why so many?” Vice has an explainer.

5 Questions You Were Too Embarrassed To Ask About America’s Clown Hysteria

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Singer Demi Lovato, who has suffered through an eating disorder, took issue with an image of her posted on Instagram. She sounds like she’s doing fine.

People Are Calling Out This Edited Picture Of Demi Lovato For Body-Shaming Her

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Screen Shot 2016-06-17 at 11.27.22 AMWhen you’re browsing the web or using an app, do you ever get the feeling that someone is watching you. Well, someone is, and that someone is software running behind the scenes. Here’s how it works.

How web apps can watch your every move

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Yahoo has its eye on Reddit’s millions of users. In an effort that we are confident will be unsuccessful, they have launched Newsroom to tackle the same news and conversation space.

Yahoo’s new Newsroom social app is ‘Reddit for the masses,’ exec says
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Facebook this week launched person-to-person commerce functionality called Marketplace to take on Craigslist. And maybe Amazon. They tend to aim high.

Facebook launches Marketplace to let you buy and sell items with nearby users

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4chan is in financial trouble. The site has a lot of bad actors, and lots of people will be happy to see it go if it does. Unfortunately the bad actors will go somewhere else.

4chan Is On Death’s Door & That’s A Win For Feminism

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An Alabama teen suffered a broken skull after being attacked at a high school football game. A social media post related to Black Lives Matter is being reported as the cause of the attackers’ anger. It’s a dangerous time that we live in.

Teen allegedly beaten up over Black Lives Matter post

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Does your teen Google her symptoms to try to self-diagnose? In addition to whatever ailment she’s searching, she may be suffering from cyberchondria.

5 Ways to Tell if You Have Cyberchondria

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Did we miss an interesting story? Please let us know.

 

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Encryption Now Available for Facebook Messenger

Facebook Messenger EncryptionYou may have seen this week that Yahoo, owner of one of the world’s most popular email clients, has been accused of allegedly allowing U.S. intelligence officials to monitor the contents of all user email traffic. This is wrong, and Yahoo is taking considerable heat for it. Even if you’ve done nothing wrong, you shouldn’t be subjected to this type of undisclosed surveillance.

Facebook owns popular messaging app WhatsApp, which has had end-to-end encryption of messages as a standard feature since earlier this year. Clearly Facebook understands that the market wants this type of solution. Encryption is now available for Facebook Messenger, and users (you and your teens) should turn it on.

There’s one catch, though. You can’t have encryption always turned on for Facebook Messenger. You have to turn it on each time you start a conversation.

FB Messenger disappearing messagesTo utilize the feature, when you hit the button to compose a new message, look at the top right corner of the screen. You will see a blue button labeled “SECRET”. Tap on that and you will see the screen at right. The conversation will be fully encrypted once you hit send.

As an added bonus, Facebook has also added the ability to make the message disappear from the recipient’s phone a set number of seconds after it is opened. To set the time, tap on the clock at bottom right (green arrow). There is no word yet as to whether a copy of the message will be retained on Facebook servers or in the bowels of your phone.

Note: If a message that you’ve received is set to disappear, and it is abusive in nature, you can still report it.

We recommend making sure you have the latest update of Facebook Messenger installed, and using encryption on all of your messages starting today. It literally takes one extra tap. You aren’t just protecting your conversations from the government’s prying eyes, but from hackers as well.

 

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

How The Laws Don’t Effectively Apply to Social Media

This is just one example, but a pretty stark one we think, of why our lawmakers need to quickly rethink and rewrite some of our laws when it comes to how they are applied to social media.

A three-judge appeals panel in Florida ruled last week that a teen was not guilty of juvenile delinquency despite having tweeted threats of a school shooting on more than one occasion.
Twitter logo

“In one post, he wrote: “night f***ing sucked can’t wait to shoot up my school soon,” according to the court. He also tweeted out “it’s time,” accompanied by a picture of a gun being slipped into a backpack.”

He later went on to insist that he was joking (of course), but the fact that he was found not guilty is a serious miscarriage of justice. Even if he was joking, a message should be sent to other students that threats, joking or otherwise, will not be tolerated.

The problem is that the Florida law, originally written in 2013, contemplated written (pen and paper) threats, and principally those made by one person to another. Despite the law being updated in 2010, it still fails to cover broadcast communications of the type made possible by social media. With social media, a user can threaten a person, a school or a whole country.

One of the judges on the panel lamented the poorly written law, and urged legislators to make changes:

“With [social media’s] popularity comes the unfortunate but inevitable problem that social media posts, like any other form of communication, can be used to make threats of violence. But many threats made on social media will fall outside the narrow language of (the law), which was originally written with pen-and-paper letters in mind.”

We should be striving to create schools where threats are exceedingly rare. Punishing offenders appropriately helps move us toward that goal. By cutting down on the number of threats, we would waste less time, cause less stress and have more resources available to investigate credible threats.

It’s time for some changes.

 

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

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