Tech Giants Team Up Against Terrorism

We are in the business of giving parents advice when it comes to kids, teens and social media. Frankly, in a lot of situations the right advice is telling parents, “Talk to your kids” or, “Make sure your kids are talking to you.” Unfortunately, some of the time that involves telling your kids not to do something they were intending to do, or something “all their friends are doing”.

Still, it’s good advice. Here’s another thing you should talk to your kids about, and it doesn’t involve telling them that they’re doing something wrong. Talk to your kids about reporting possible terrorist activity if they see it online.

Today social media giants Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Microsoft (Skype and LinkedIn) announced that they will be collaborating to share best practices around preventing the spread of terrorist activity online. According to the Facebook release:

“Starting today, we commit to the creation of a shared industry database of “hashes” — unique digital “fingerprints” — for violent terrorist imagery or terrorist recruitment videos or images that we have removed from our services. By sharing this information with each other, we may use the shared hashes to help identify potential terrorist content on our respective hosted consumer platforms.”

Of course, if you’re an adult and you see some terrorist-related online – a threat, possible recruiting activity – you report it, either to the social media company or the police. Are you sure that your kids would do the same?

Consider school fight videos that are constantly being shared online. In addition to the person filming the video that was posted, the bystanders are often standing around filming the event rather than stepping in to help. It happens too often.

Surveys show that kids and teens are similarly reticent to report cyberbullying and other toxic behavior when they see them online. That’s another issue, but when it comes to terrorism, there is no excuse for not saying something. And the downside for falsely reporting something that is not terrorism (if you think it is) is zero.

Make sure your kids know that reporting terrorism is the right thing to do.

 

 

If your teen or tween is active online and you are having trouble keeping up, we can help. We respect your kids’ privacy and give you the tools you need to be a better digital parent. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Canadian Survey Weighs Cyberbullying on Social Media

Unsurprising conclusion: The more time you spend on social media, the more likely you are to be harassed by another user.

That is just one takeaway from a new survey of social media users by the Angus Reid Institute in Canada. Canadians generally have the reputation of being kindler and gentler than those of us on this side of the border, but the results of the survey show that cyberbullying trends are similar in both countries.

The survey polled 1,530 adults aged 18 and up. Of the group, 89% were users of social media in varying degrees, and that number is 98% for the 18 – 34 year old respondents. Percentage of respondents who use the following social networks at least a couple of times per week:
sm-harassment

  • Facebook – 69%
  • Twitter – 17%
  • Instagram – 15%
  • Snapchat – 10%
  • LinkedIn – 8%
  • Tumblr – 5%
  • Other – 11%

When the survey looks at the frequency of social media use, they grouped respondents into the following categories:

  • 18% are Super Users who use multiple networks, multiple times per day
  • 42% are Frequent Users who use social media every day
  • 16% are Regular Users who use social media at least once per week
  • 11% are Light Users who are mostly on Facebook, but don’t use it very often
  • 15% don’t currently use social media, but some of those did but have quit

When looking at the responses of all who do use social networks, 31% claim that they have been cyberbullied on social media. Of the Super Users, fully 50% have experienced harassment online.

It’s pretty clear from the results that the more time you spend online, the more likely you are to experience harassment.

When considering the age of the respondents, as you might expect younger users tend to be a rougher crowd. 44% of the 18 – 34 year old cohort report having been harassed online at some point.

What does this mean for parents? Well, teens younger than 18 were not included in the survey, but two factors – age and time spent online – seem to correlate highly with the incidence on online abuse. If your teens are like mine, they are young by definition and tend to spend A LOT of time online.

As a parent, if your teen or tween hasn’t been harassed online yet, you should be prepared for the chance that she might be. There is no better preparation for this than talking about it today.

Establish an action plan for how she will respond when it happens, and that she should come to you for help is she is unsure of what to do. You can also review what options are available for dealing with abusers on each social network.

Incidentally, when asked how well social media companies are dealing with abusive users, 53% say that the networks are not doing enough to prevent the bad actors from cyberbullying, or doing something about it when it is reported.

Check back later this week for Part 2, where we look at what types of cyberbullying the survey found to be common online.

 

 

 

If your teen or tween is active online and you are having trouble keeping up, we can help. We respect your kids’ privacy and give you the tools you need to be a better digital parent. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Looking for Teens to Take Our Cyberbullying Survey

Here’s a shout out to our newest intern Julia. Julia has been working with us since the beginning of the summer. She is a junior at Montgomery High School here in New Jersey, is an excellent student and her interests include computer science and marching band.

no-cyberbullyingThe latest project that she has been working on is a new teen cyberbullying survey.

The rise of cyberbullying, and the increased interest in it, has tracked closely with the rise of cell phones and social media. There have been dozens of cyberbullying surveys over the last few years, but things are changing so quickly with the internet and social media that we are very interested in seeing some current data. Some of those surveys have included in their sample both parents and teens. We wanted to do one that just focuses on teens, and that’s exactly what we have here.

If you are a teen, we would love to have you fill out the survey. It just takes a few minutes. If you are a parent, please ask your teens to fill it out, or share it with friends.

THIRDPARENT CYBERBULLYING SURVEY

We’ll be back with a summary of the full results next month. If you want to see the results, look for the blog post by following us on Facebook or sign up for our newsletter below.

 

 

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Use Social Media To Highlight Soft Skills

An article in the Wall Street Journal today outlines a dilemma employers are facing in today’s changed work environment: it’s tough to find new employees with the appropriate soft skills.

“Companies across the U.S. say it is becoming increasingly difficult to find applicants who can communicate clearly, take initiative, problem-solve and get along with co-workers.

While such skills have always appealed to employers, decades-long shifts in the economy have made them especially crucial now. Companies have automated or outsourced many routine tasks, and the jobs that remain often require workers to take on broader responsibilities that demand critical thinking, empathy or other abilities that computers can’t easily simulate.”

The article cites a Wall Street Journal survey of 900 executives, which found that 92% felt that soft sills are as important as or more important than technical skills.

The article also cites a survey from 2015 performed by LinkedIn, which attempted to identify which soft skills are most in demand, and therefore most likely to land candidates a job. The list of traits, in resumeorder, was:

  • Ability to communicate
  • Organization
  • Capacity for teamwork
  • Punctuality
  • Critical thinking
  • Social savvy
  • Creativity
  • Adaptability

We don’t think that people possessing these traits don’t exist; if companies can’t find them, we put the blame on the recruiting process as it now stands. From what we’ve seen, if 100 candidates apply for a job opening, the standard procedure is that those 100 resumes are uploaded into an Applicant Tracking System (ATS) and an algorithm identifies the 3 or 4 best candidates based on objective criteria programmed into the ATS before the search began. The initial resume-screening phase looks for technical skills and experience – it does not attempt to consider soft skills, and therefore isn’t optimized to find candidates who possess them.

We think the system is going to change, and young employees without a robust job history or deep technical skills could be the biggest beneficiaries. Here’s how.

A CareerBuilder survey earlier this your found that 60% of employers admit to using social media to vet candidates at some point during the recruitment process (we think the real number is higher). If a company is not interviewing/hiring candidates with strong soft skills, it’s probably because the resumes making it through the ATS to the interview stage have strong technical skills, but lack those soft skills.

Looking at candidates’ public social media can be a great way to identify candidates who do possess some of those soft skills, and the opposite. Ability to communicate clearly, attention to detail, social savvy and showing good judgment can all be evaluated for a candidate who is active online, and most candidates are.

This is good news for job seekers with strong soft skills. By sharpening your social media game, you can make yourself more hirable in an era where who you are online is likely to become an increasingly important consideration for hiring managers.

Some experts view social media as primarily a liability for job seekers, and caution candidates to keep the excessive partying, foul language and questionable commentary off of social media. That is a good idea, but we may be entering an era where clean, well thought out social media profiles can be an important asset.

Note to employers: If you’re looking for help making social media vetting a bigger part of your hiring process, ThirdPro can help. To find out how we can help your company, contact us today.

 

 

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Texas Tech Football Coach Admits to Catfishing Players

Well, sort of. In any case, we’re not fans of this story.

Let us start by saying that if you’re the leader of an organization, and expect those below you to trust in your leadership, you shouldn’t do anything to make them believe you aren’t worthy of that trust.

Texas Tech LogoTexas Tech football coach Kliff Kingsbury admitted in an interview last week that he and his staff use fake social media accounts to spy on monitor players. Not cool.

According to Kingsbury, he and his staff set up fake accounts on Twitter and Facebook and make them look like they are owned by attractive girls, complete with cute profile pictures. The fake account then sends friend requests to his players, who are generally quick to accept the request, because, you know, cute girls… For all we know, they are doing it on Snapchat and Instagram as well.

The coaches are then privy to what players are posting, even in the event that their accounts are private. According to Kingsbury, “Those [accounts] are heavily monitored, for sure,”

We understand why coaches would do this, but don’t think they should. It is spying, and is using a totally dishonest tactics to get it done. We can’t imagine that they’ve disclosed to players that they are, or might be, doing this. When asked to defend the actions, Kingsbury offered,“[Social media is] complete and utter madness.”

That’s no excuse for deceiving your players – players who are expected to trust and respect you. I wouldn’t want one of my kids to be playing for a program that does this. It’s one thing to monitor public social media (one of the things we do here at ThirdParent, by the way), and something that we understand most major athletic programs are doing. It is another thing entirely to deceive people to gain access to their private posts.

Texas Tech ought to know better. Stay tuned for the backlash.

 

 

 

If you are worried that your teens or tweens are at risk, or are acting inappropriately online, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Infographic: How To Keep An Eye on Your Kids’ Social Media Accounts

Screen Shot 2016-06-20 at 1.05.27 PMThe infographic below does a great job showing not only that most of today’s kids have internet access, but also how much internet access they have.

Most of the advice for parents in the graphic is on point, but one recommendation is a little bit outdated – they recommend putting computers in a central location in the house so at least some supervision can happen. That is outdated because, as the research shows, 91% of teens go online from their mobile devices. That advice worked better when each household had only one computer with internet access.


Source: Fix.com Blog

Keeping the family computer in a central location is a good first step, but it is not going to capture a lot of social media activity. Most kids have their own phone with internet access, and most kids have either their own tablet, laptop or desktop. Another point that many parents miss is that almost anything “adults” can do on their computer, a teen can do on a smartphone. And, from the infographic, 67% of teens say that they know how to hide their interest activity from their parents.

We aren’t saying that parents shouldn’t monitor computer activity – they should. Our point is that if parents are only seeing what their teen is doing online while looking over her shoulder, they aren’t getting the whole picture.

If you are worried that your teen or tween is at risk, or doing something she shouldn’t be doing, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

Is Social Media Causing Teacher-Student Sex?

Okay, that’s a silly headline. Or is it?

The ladies on The View kind of tried to make that case this week. Watch the video below to see for yourself.


ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

The story at issue is that of a teacher from Texas who became pregnant from a relationship with a 13-year old, her student. That’s just wrong, but let’s not blame it on social media. It’s true that social media can bring students and teachers closer together, but for the most part that is a good thing. Better rapport leads to better outcomes in a mentor/pupil relationship.

There have to be boundaries between teachers and students. Some school boards have made moves to put a policy in place that outlines what means of communication between teachers and students are permissible, and in what circumstances. That’s good in principle but the teachers themselves need to be responsible for doing what’s right.

There are over 300,000 teachers in Texas public schools. There have been 162 cases this year or alleged improper relationships (yes, that’s 162 too many). We assume not all of those include the parties actually having sex. We further assume that the vast majority of those relationships would have happened whether social media existed or not.

Almost all teachers conduct themselves appropriately. Period.

That’s a silly headline.

 

 

The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

Europe Forces Tech Giants to Tackle Terrorism, Hate Speech

It’s no surprise that hate speech including support of terrorism is a serious issue on social media sites and perhaps even multiplayer gaming platforms. Europe, in conjunction with a group of tech heavyweights, is taking some more serious steps to combat it.

The European Commission, the Continent’s governing body, announced today that it has reached a landmark agreement with Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Twitter wherein the popular tech platforms will voluntarily take steps to combat not only the creation and sharing of terrorist propaganda, but also some forms of person to person cyberbullying and hate speech.

European CommissionAs part of the agreement, the companies have agreed to:

  • Develop clear rules outlining what types of hate speech are not permitted
  • Improve the ability of users to report abuse on their platform
  • Upon notification, remove “the majority” of hate speech from their network within 24 hours
  • Cooperate with other social media and technology platforms to share best practices
  • Cooperate with European Union countries when indications of terrorist support are uncovered

The overarching goal is to ensure that hate speech is policed as strictly on social media as it is on traditional media platforms, while still preserving freedom of expression. Where they draw the line is that speech that “offends, shocks or disturbs the State or any sector of the population” is not prohibited; but serious incitement to violence and hatred is.

 

 

If you want to make sure your teen is not at risk, we can help. The ThirdParent initial audit is now FREE (previously a $49 value). Ongoing monitoring is $15 per month and you can cancel at any time. Click here to sign up today!

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

 

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook for more news and information on keeping your teens safe online. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter below.

 

This Week in Social Media News For Parents

Stories for the week ending 4/8/2016

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Yikes – as sexting becomes amore mainstream romantic activity, young medical patients are increasingly willing to send pictures of their genitalia to doctors. The docs are not totally okay with it.

Sexting for your health: patients send genitalia photos, raising legal concerns

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Are we done writing “Facebook is dead” articles? We should be. This picture is worth a thousand words. And $323 billion in market value.

Facebook user engagement

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For the last couple of years, video game journalists have been battling gamers over a number of issues, not the least of which is a backlash against over-sexualized, misogynistic games. The whole thing has been dubbed “Gamergate”. We wouldn’t actually say that the journalists are losing, but the whole thing has resulted in a number of journalists, particularly females, being abused on Twitter. Now Gamergate may have cost a female Nintendo employee her job.

Did Nintendo Fire an Employee to Appease a Gamergate Mob?

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Do you have questions about sex or a difficult or abusive romantic relationship that are too embarrassing to ask a doctor or friend? Three Indian folks have created a Snapchat account so that you can discretely get answers.

Snapchat account aims to help teens in abusive relationships

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We kind of have a problem with this: If someone send you a message via Facebook Messenger, and you aren’t FB friends with that person, Facebook hides the message in a folder without giving you a notification. There has to be a better way.

Facebook is hiding messages from you in a secret inbox — here’s how to find it

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Students from Princeton High School in New Jersey were playing a friendly game of beer pong in a family basement. Problems in addition to underage drinking: The game was Nazi-themed. One of the students Snapchatted the festivities. Another student screen grabbed it and posted it on her blog. No winners here.

“Jews vs. Nazis” Beer Pong Played by Princeton High School Students

why you lying~
In a survey of 2,000 UK residents, only 18% claim that they are completely truthful on social media. 75% admit that they indulge in embellishment. It’s not shocking that people dress up their online image. It’s surprising that they will admit it.

Over 75% of people lie on social media

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If you think that taking to social media while drinking alcohol is a bad idea, the University of Albany has some research that is in line with your view.

Study finds link between problematic drinking and problematic Facebooking

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A 22-year old French man has been sentenced to 6 months in jail for a text message to his ex that included a gun emoji. Was it really a threat?

Man given jail time for sending gun emoji to ex

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If you found a random USB drive would you plug it into your computer to see what was on it. Researchers at the University of Illinois found that 48% of people are more nosy than they are wary of malware.

A Whole Lot of Nitwits Will Plug a Random USB Into Their Computer, Study Finds

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Did we miss a big story? Please let us know.

 

NEW: For a limited time the ThirdParent audit is FREE (normally $49). You can cancel at any time. Sign up today!

 

 

Contact ThirdParent any time for help and resources for monitoring child and teen internet activity.

Work at a high school or college? We have custom solutions for monitoring dangerous or inappropriate activity. Learn more.

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