This Week in Social Media News For Parents

Stories for the week ending 12/11/2015

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“Offensive and disturbing” photos rocked Citadel military college in South Carolina this week. Cadets were photographed singing Christmas carols dressed in hoods a la the Ku Klux Klan, and the pictures were posted to Snapchat and Facebook. While the pictures were quickly taken down, the damage had been done.

Citadel cadets suspended over controversial white hood photos

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It’s no laughing matter but it’s making some people smile. The U.S. State Department is on social media attempting to fight ISIS supporters online. It’s not going well, particularly on Ask.fm.

The state department tried to fight ISIS on Ask.fm, and it didn’t go well

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Emory University has become the latest to consider a ban of Yik Yak after harassing posts at the college. Yik Yak would have to agree to the ban and erect a geofence. We’re willing to bet that they won’t.

Emory considers ban on Yik Yak app after student complaints

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Billionaire Mark Cuban thinks Apple should consider kicking Twitter out of the iTunes store if they (Twitter) can’t get a handle on abusive users. Since Twitter isn’t the one posting the abuse, this is a tricky situation.

 

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In a sexting incident where police recovered 351 inappropriate photos of middle and high school students, the Colorado court system did the right thing and did not press criminal charges. “Prosecutors say there were no “aggravating” factors discovered in the investigation, including any adult involvement, coercion, bullying or posting of pictures to the Internet.” Nice job, folks. Cut it out, kids.

Despite evidence, no charges will be filed in Cañon City sexting case

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If you doubt the power of Facebook, here’s a great example for you. Rachel Brown, a student at New York University, was dismayed at the handling of recent high profile events in Chicago. She posted an event on Facebook – a party celebrating the resignation of the Mayor and State Attorney. The party was fake. Hundreds of people still showed up to protest.

How a fake Facebook event turned into a real Chicago protest

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Did we miss a big story? Please let us know.

 

 

 

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